Tigerwood – Hardwood lumber products

Tigerwood - Hardwood lumber products

Tigerwood –(Astronium Graveolens )

rough sawn tigerwood blanks
Better known on the international market as Muiracatiara or Goncalo Alves, but does have lesser known names such as Brazilian Koa or Jabillo. It cuts easy for being a dense species and has very good resistance to rot and decay. The heartwood is light brown in color with moderate to wild black streaking. Due to the color variation, there is a particular allure to furniture builders, although its uses in decking and flooring are not new. Available as both FSC and Non-FSC certified Tigerwood is kiln-dried (KD) and available as decking, flooring, dimensional lumber, E4E, S4S, RS (Rough Sawn), deck tiles, and table slabs.

Common Name:

Goncalo Alves, Tigerwood, Jobillo

Botanical Name:

Astronium spp. (A. graveolens and A. fraxinifolium)

Indigenous to:

From Mexico southward to Brazil

Modulus of Rupture:

16,970 lbf/in2 (117.0 MPa)

Shrinkage:

Radial: 4.2%, Tangential: 7.8%, Volumetric: 11.2%, T/R Ratio: 1.9

How is it dried:

kiln-dried (KD)

Is it dried quickly:

Normal Drying Schedule is applicable to thickness lower or equal to 38 mm.
It must be used in compliance with the code of practice.
For thickness from 38 to 75 mm, the air relative humidity should be increased by 5 % at each step.
For thickness over 75 mm, a 10 % increase should be considered

Stability:

Info coming soon

Exterior Wood Recommendation:

Class 4 – in ground or fresh water contact

Fastening Method:

Nailing / screwing: good but pre-drilling is necessary
Gluing: poor not recommended without proper oily wood procedures

Ecosystem impact:

This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Toxicity and allergic reactions:

Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Goncalo Alves has been reported as a sensitizer. Usually most common reactions simply include eye and skin irritation.

Odor:

No distinguishable odor

Product we manufacture using this species:

Decking, hardwood flooring, dimensional lumber, E4E, S4S, RS (Rough Sawn), deck tiles, and wood slabs

Other common uses:

Cabinetwork
Sliced veneer
Flooring
Wood-ware
Turned goods
Exterior joinery
Interior joinery
Interior panelling
Heavy carpentry
Musical instruments
Tool handles (resilient woods)
Sculpture

Susceptibility to

Dry Wood borers:

Durable – sapwood demarcated (risk limited to sapwood)

Fungi:

Class 1 – very durable

Termites:

Class D – durable

Treatability:

Class 4 – not permeable

Against dry wood borer attacks: does not require any preservative treatment
In case of risk of temporary humidification: does not require any preservative treatment
In case of risk of permanent humidification: does not require any preservative treatment

Janka Hardness:

  • 2160 lbf (17,500 N)

Itauba Hardwood lumber products

Itauba - Hardwood lumber products

Itauba –(Mezilaurus Itauba)

Itauba is also known as Taoub or Kaneelhout. Most of the various countries that use Itauba use it as wood siding, decking, and deck tiles. This species is durable, dense, rot and decay resistant. It is only a matter of time before this species of wood becomes much more prevalent on the decking and siding market. Color varies between a goldish brown to a deep lustrous brown lacking a distinct sapwood. There are natural small black oil spots that are present throughout a high percentage of this species. Itauba is less expensive than the other woods and is a good alternative if the black spots are acceptable. The length of lumber produced from this species is not as long as some of the other species. Available as FSC certified and kiln-dried (KD). We have itauba available in decking, flooring, dimensional lumber, E4E, S4S, RS (Rough Sawn), deck tiles, and table slabs.

Common Name:

Itauba, Louro, Taoub, JAUNE, Kaneelhout

Botanical Name:

Mezilaurus Itauba

Indigenous to:

South and Central America Brazil, French Guiana, Suriname

Modulus of Rupture:

Info coming soon

Shrinkage:

Radial: 3.7%, Tangential: 9.7%, Volumetric: .60%, T/R Ratio: 2.6

How is it dried:

kiln-dried (KD)

Is it dried quickly:

No Drying must be done slow and carefully, in order to reduce
defects

Stability:

Moderately Stable

Exterior Wood Recommendation:

Species covering the use class 5: Yes
The possible presence of few demarcated sapwood in sawn woods may have an influence on the
expected durability. This species naturally covers the use class 5 (end-uses in marine environment or
in brackish water) due to its high specific gravity and its repulsive extracts content.

Fastening Method:

Nailing / screwing: good but pre-drilling is necessary
Gluing: Yes (for interior only)

Ecosystem impact:

Info coming soon

Toxicity and allergic reactions:

Info coming soon

Odor:

There is no discernible odor.

Product we manufacture using this species:

decking, flooring, dimensional lumber, E4E, S4S, RS (Rough Sawn), deck tiles, and table slabs

Other common uses:

Hydraulic works (seawater)

Sleepers
Bridges (parts in contact with water or ground)

Bridges (parts not in contact with water or ground)

Exterior joinery

Interior joinery

Interior panelling

Exterior panelling

Flooring

Sliced veneer

Poles

Furniture or furniture components

Cabinetwork (high class furniture)

Seats

Shingles

Turned goods

Vehicle or container flooring

Ship building (ribs)

Ship building (planking and deck)

Open boats

Stairs (inside)

Heavy carpentry

Wood frame house

Susceptibility to

Dry Wood borers:

Heartwood durable but sapwood not clearly demarcated

Fungi:

Class 1 – very durable

Termites:

Class D – durable

Treatability:

Class 4 – not permeable

Against dry wood borer attacks: requires appropriate preservative treatment
In case of risk of temporary humidification: does not require any preservative treatment
In case of risk of permanent humidification: does not require any preservative treatment

Janka Hardness:

  • 2,900 lbf (17,620 N)

Tatajuba – Hardwood lumber products

Tatajuba - Hardwood lumber products

Tatajuba –(Bagassa Guianensis)

Tatajuba also known by a few other names such as cow-wood, Amarelao, or Bagasse. It is another hardwood that has not been prevalent in all international markets. Tatajuba has characteristics similar to that of Ipe and Cumaru. It could be a good alternative to budget-conscious clients. Tatajuba is not as difficult to work with as Ipe or Cumaru. The color ranges from golden to reddish brown. Fresh cut Tatajuba appears yellow, which is close to yellowheart but darkens over time. It is available as FSC certified and is kiln-dried (KD). We have Tatajuba as decking, flooring, dimensional lumber, E4E, S4S, RS (Rough Sawn), deck tiles, and table slabs.

Common Name:

Cow-wood, Amarelao, or Bagasse

Botanical Name:

Bagassa Guianensis

Indigenous to:

Info coming soon

Modulus of Rupture:

2,752,000 lbf/in2

Shrinkage:

Radial: 4.4%, Tangential: 5.9%, Volumetric: 9.6%, T/R Ratio: 1.3

How is it dried:

kiln-dried (KD)

Is it dried quickly:

No : normal to slow is recommended

High risks of distortion in presence of highly interlocked grain. During drying, spacer sticks may stain the wood.

Stability:

Moderately Stable

Exterior Wood Recommendation:

Use class ensured by natural durability: class 4 – in ground or fresh water contact
Species covering the use class 5: Yes
This species naturally covers the use class 5 (end-uses in marine environment or in brackish water)
due to its high silica content.Against dry wood borer attacks: does not require any preservative treatment
In case of risk of temporary humidification: does not require any preservative treatment
In case of risk of permanent humidification: does not require any preservative treatment

Fastening Method:

Nailing / screwing: Yes but pre-drilling is required
Gluing: Yes

Ecosystem impact:

This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Toxicity and allergic reactions:

Although severe reactions are rare, Tatajuba has been reported to cause skin irritation.

Odor:

Info coming soon

Products we manufacture using this species:

Decking, flooring, dimensional lumber, E4E, S4S, RS (Rough Sawn), deck tiles, and table slabs

Other common uses:

Flooring Current furniture or furniture components
Ship building (planking and deck) Ship building (ribs)
Cabinetwork (high class furniture) Wood frame house
Interior joinery Interior panelling
Sliced veneer Sleepers
Hydraulic works (fresh water) Exterior joinery
Exterior panelling Bridges (parts in contact with water or ground)
Bridges (parts not in contact with water or ground) Heavy carpentry
Turned goods Stairs (inside)
Vehicle or container flooring Moulding
Note: Interlocked grain may be troublesome in the use of this wood.

Susceptibility to

Dry Wood borers:

Durable – sapwood demarcated (risk limited to sapwood)

Fungi:

Class 1 – very durable

Termites:

Class D – durable

Treatability:

Class 3 – poorly permeable

Janka Hardness:

  • 1,720 lbf (7,650 N)

Garapa – Hardwood lumber products

Garapa - Hardwood lumber products

Garapa – (Apuleia Leiocarpa)

Other common names include Brazilian Oak, Brazilian Ash, Cobre, and Garrote. The wood is medium density for a tropical hardwood and mills nicely. Using sharp cutters is important as It does have a dulling effect on cutter heads. Our factory sharpens tooling on site in order to provide excellent quality when milling such woods. Garapa is golden yellow in appearance and is available from our facilities as both FSC and Non-FSC certifications. Our Garapa is kiln-dried (KD) readily available as decking, flooring, dimensional lumber, E4E, S4S, RS (Rough Sawn), deck tiles, and table slabs.

Common Name:

Info coming soon

Botanical Name:

Apuleia Leiocarpa

Indigenous to:

The variety “molaris” is found in the Amazonian forest, mainly in flooded areas. The main species, Apuleia leiocarpa is found mainly in the South of Brazil, in the Atlantic coast forests, easily colonizing cleared areas.

Modulus of Rupture:

18,530 lbf/in2 (127.8 MPa)

Shrinkage:

Radial: 4.2%, Tangential: 7.5%, Volumetric: 11.4%, T/R Ratio: 1.8

How is it dried:

kiln-dried (KD)

Is it dried quickly:

No should be dried slowly

Stability:

Moderately Stable to Stable

Exterior Wood Recommendation:

Use class ensured by natural durability: class 2 – inside or under cover (dampness possible)

Species covering the use class 5: Yes

Against dry wood borer attacks:does not require any preservative treatment

In case of risk of temporary humidification: requires appropriate preservative treatment

In case of risk of permanent humidification: use not recommendedThe natural durability of Grapia is very variable. In some cases, this variability can be observed inside the same piece of wood. This species cannot be used without appropriate preservative treatment for end-uses under use class 3 except for some parts of a work such as windows, less exposed than
others (entrance doors, shutters).
This species naturally covers the use class 5 (end-uses in marine environment or in brackish water)
due to its high silica content. However, it is not recommended to use it in case of strong structural
constraints due to its medium mechanical properties; it is most suitable for end-uses like shipbuilding.

Fastening Method:

Nailing / screwing: good but pre-drilling is necessary
Gluing: Yes

Ecosystem impact:

This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Toxicity and allergic reactions:

Although severe reactions are uncommon, Garapa has been reported to occasionally cause skin irritation.

Odor:

Nothing discernable

Products we manufacture using this species:

decking, flooring, dimensional lumber, E4E, S4S, RS (Rough Sawn), deck tiles, and table slabs

Other common uses:

  • Exterior joinery
  • Light carpentry
  • Heavy carpentry
  • Hydraulic works (seawater)
  • Ship building (ribs)
  • Cooperage
  • Turned goods
  • Furniture or furniture components
  • Wood frame house
  • Flooring
  • Industrial or heavy flooring
  • Interior joinery
  • Ship building
  • Stairs (inside)
  • Vehicle or container flooring
  • Cabinetwork (high class furniture)
  • Tool handles (resilient woods)
  • Formwork
  • Boxes and crates Wood-ware
  • Note: Finishing is easy but filling is recommended.

Susceptibility to

Dry Wood borers:

Durable – sapwood demarcated (risk limited to sapwood)

Fungi:

Class 3 – moderately durable

Termites:

Class M – moderately durable

Treatability:

Class 3 – poorly permeable

Janka Hardness:

  • 1700 lbf (20,040 N)

Andiroba – Hardwood lumber products

Andiroba - Hardwood lumber products

Andiroba – (Carapa Guianensis Aubl)

Also known as Cedro-Macho and Crabwood among other names, this wood is of medium density and texture and is moderately easy to work with. Found in the northern region of Brazil and Maranhão, the tree reaches heights from 30m to 50m and diameters from 50cm to 180cm.

Common Name:

crabwood, royal mahogany, krappa, figueroa, carapote, carapa, camacari, masabalo

Botanical Name:

(Carapa Guianensis Aubl)

Indigenous to:

Central and South America

Modulus of Rupture:

15,580 lbf/in2 (107.4 MPa)

Shrinkage:

Radial: 3.1%, Tangential: 7.6%, Volumetric: 10.4%, T/R Ratio: 2.5

How is it dried:

Info coming soon

Is it dried quickly:

No – Normal/Slow

Stability:

Moderately Stable

Exterior Wood Recommendation:

Use class ensured by natural durability: class 4 – in ground or fresh water contact
Species covering the use class 5: Yes This species naturally covers the use class 5 (end-uses in marine environment or in brackish water) due to its high specific gravity and hardness.Against dry wood borer attacks: does not require any preservative treatment
In case of risk of temporary humidification: does not require any preservative treatment
In case of risk of permanent humidification: does not require any preservative treatment

Fastening Method:

Nailing / screwing: good but pre-drilling is necessary
Gluing: Yes
Note: Tends to split when nailing

Ecosystem impact:

No commercial restriction, Andiroba is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, however species found in equador Ecuador, Carapa megistocarpa, is listed as endangered.

Toxicity and allergic reactions:

Although severe reactions are uncommon, Andiroba has occasionally been reported to cause eye and skin irritation.

Odor:

No characteristic odor.

Products we manufacture using this species:

decking, flooring

Other common uses:

Veneer both faces of plywood for furniture or furniture components
Cabinetwork (high end cabinetry) Typically as Sliced veneer
Exterior and Interior joinery
Interior panelling
Flooring
Stairs (inside)
Light carpentry
Laminated Exterior panelling
Seats
Turned goods
Moulding
Boxes and crates
Shingles
*Note: Generally used as substitute for MAHOGANY (Swietenia spp.).

Susceptibility to

Dry Wood borers:

susceptible – sapwood not or slightly demarcated (risk in all the wood)

Fungi:

class 3-4 – moderately to poorly durable

Termites:

class M – moderately durable

Treatability:

Class 1 – easily permeable

Janka Hardness:

  • 3190 lbf (29,290 N)

Taurai – Hardwood lumber products

Taurai - Hardwood lumber products

Tauari –(Couratari spp.)

Taurai also known as Couatari, Wadara, or Brazilian Oak, this is a species that has not seen much use on a broad market. It’s machining characteristics and workability is excellent and has made it the premier wood for window and door builders in France. Available as FSC certified and kiln-dried (KD). We have Taurai in flooring, dimensional lumber, E4E, S4S, RS (Rough Sawn), GMS, Fixed width planks, deck tiles, and table slabs. Non-FSC is also available.

Common Name:

Couatari, Wadara, or Brazilian Oak

Botanical Name:

Couratari spp.

Indigenous to:

Several commercial species range from Costa Rica and Panama southward
to the Guianas and Brazilian Amazon.

Modulus of Rupture:

Info coming soon

Shrinkage:

Info coming soon

How is it dried:

Info coming soon

Is it dried quickly:

Yes and additionally Must be dried as soon as possible after felling to avoid
blue stain.

Stability:

Moderately Stable

Exterior Wood Recommendation:

Use class ensured by natural durability: class 1 – inside (no dampness)
Species covering the use class 5: NoNote: Several species, with different natural durability, are grouped under the name TAUARI. Some species and origins could be used without preservative treatment for end-uses under use class 2. However, commercial lots are usually constituted by blended species. It is advisable to use the less durable woods as a point of reference.Against dry wood borer attacks: requires appropriate preservative treatment
In case of risk of temporary humidification: requires appropriate preservative treatment
In case of risk of permanent humidification: use not recommended

Fastening Method:

Nailing / screwing: good but pre-drilling is necessary
Gluing: correct

Ecosystem impact:

No commercial restriction

Toxicity and allergic reactions:

Info coming soon

Odor:

Info coming soon

Products we manufacture using this species:

flooring, dimensional lumber, E4E, S4S, RS (Rough Sawn), deck tiles, and table slabs

Other common uses:

Stairs (inside) Veneer for back or face of plywood
Blockboard Moulding
Interior panelling Boxes and crates
Formwork Exterior joinery
Interior joinery Current furniture or furniture components
Light carpentry Glued laminated
Flooring Turned goods
Seats Sliced veneer
Veneer for interior of plywood

Susceptibility to

Dry Wood borers:

Susceptible – sapwood not or slightly demarcated (risk in all the wood)

Fungi:

Class 5 – not durable

Termites:

Class S – susceptible

Treatability:

Class 1 – easily permeable

Janka Hardness:

  • 1650 lbf (7339.56 N)

Massaranduba – Hardwood lumber products

Massaranduba (Manilkara Bidentata spp).

  • Massaranduba being hand inspected and stacked for export.
  • Massaranduba being prepped for export.
  • Massaranduba dimensional lumber.
  • Massaranduba pre-grooved decking.

Common names include bulletwood, Brazilian redwood, or massa and is a wood of high density but will remain easy to work. Most often used as decking or flooring it does respond to steam bending better than most other Brazilian hardwoods. With a straight grain which can have an almost purplish hue this is a wood that has a distinctive look. Though its heartwood often is a shade of purple, Manilkara bidentata is sometimes confused with another tropical tree widely known as “purpleheart”. Our wholesale mill produces both FSC certified  and non-fsc massaranduba. We have massaranduba in decking, flooring, dimensional lumber, E4E, S4S, RS (Rough Sawn), deck tiles, and table slabs.

Massaranduba - Hardwood lumber productsmassaranduba decking board
Massaranduba Decking
Brazilian Redwood Decking
california redwood decking
California Redwood Decking
“Traditional” Redwood Decking
AppearanceRed to dark reddish brown. Straight grained and smooth. The color can be preserved using annual applications of a UV inhibiting deck oil.Varies considerably depending on grade. Color ranges from brownish-pink to reddish brown. This is a softwood that will requiring staining if you want it to have a color.
DurabilityMassaranduba is a hard, heavy wood. Very resistant to decay and termites. Average lifespan of 30+ yearsHigher cost grades are more durable than most. Quick to weather and split. Treatment is required.
Strength (Load Capacity)Over 2x stronger than California Redwood (29,200 psi)10,000 psi
HardnessOver 7x harder than California Redwood (3,190 Janka Hardness)420 Janka Hardness
MaintenanceVery low maintenance with an average lifespan of 30+ years.Periodic staining and board replacement my be required depending on age, climate and use.

Common Name:

Bulletwood, Balatá, Brazilian redwood ausubo, massaranduba, and sometimes even “cow-tree”

Botanical Name:

Manilkara Bidentata spp.

Indigenous to:

Large area of northern South America, Central America and the Caribbean

Modulus of Rupture:

27,870 lbf/in2 (192.2 MPa)

Shrinkage:

Radial: 6.7%, Tangential: 9.4%, Volumetric: 16.8%, T/R Ratio: 1.4

How is it dried:

kiln-dried (KD)

Is it dried quickly:

No – Note: Surface drying prior to kiln drying is recommended.

Stability:

Moderately Stable

Exterior Wood Recommendation:

Use class ensured by natural durability: class 4 – in ground or fresh water contact
Species covering the use class 5: Yes This species naturally covers the use class 5 (end-uses in marine environment or in brackish water) due to its high specific gravity and hardness.Against dry wood borer attacks: does not require any preservative treatment
In case of risk of temporary humidification: does not require any preservative treatment
In case of risk of permanent humidification: does not require any preservative treatment

Fastening Method:

Nailing / screwing: Good but pre-drilling is necessary
Gluing: Correct (for interior only)
Note: Gluing requires care (very dense wood).

Ecosystem impact:

This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Toxicity and allergic reactions:

Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Massaranduba has been occasionally reported to cause minor skin irritation.

Odor:

No characteristic odor.

Products we manufacture using this species:

decking, flooring, dimensional lumber, E4E, S4S, RS (Rough Sawn), deck tiles, and table slabs.

Other common uses:

Hydraulic works (fresh water) Bridges (parts in contact with water or ground)
Sleepers Poles
Stakes Wood frame house
Sliced veneer Stringed instruments (bow)
Ship building (planking and deck) Arched goods
Sculpture Tool handles (resilient woods)
Turned goods Shingles
Industrial or heavy flooring Heavy carpentry
Stairs (inside) Current furniture or furniture components
Bridges (parts not in contact with water or ground)
Note: In Brazil, M. elata and M. longifolia are used for pulpwood.

Susceptibility to

Dry Wood borers:

Class 1 – very durable

Fungi:

Durable – sapwood demarcated (risk limited to sapwood)

Termites:

Class D – durable

Treatability:

Class 1 – easily permeable

Janka Hardness:

  • 3190 lbf (29,290 N)